Archive for August, 2018

Flower Show at Buckland St Mary 2018

Today was the annual flower and vegetable show in the local village hall.  I entered just 6 categories this year as I knew I couldn’t get down there on Sunday morning to put in perishable items as I would be serving breakfast to our guests.

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The show was very well attended and I saw lots of my friends there and I had a cup of tea and a lovely piece of carrot cake whilst waiting for the prize giving.

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I got two 2nds, one 3rd and two “highly recommended” so not bad for only 6 entries.

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I was miffed our eggs only got a 3rd, I really think they should have been a 1st as they had the deepest yellow yolks.DSC02407

But it’s nice to think my Blackberry jam and my Marmalade are up to standard, certainly our guests seem to think so.

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I only managed to print 2 pictures of my container garden instead of 3 as the 3rd file was corrupted so I got a 2nd for that.

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And a Highly Recommended for my piggies down on the farm.

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All in all it was a good turnout and a bit of fun entering various categories. Here’s to next year and a few more entries.

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

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The Brecon Mountain Railway

The second part of our Bellringer’s coach outing was to the Brecon Mountain Railway which is a narrow gauge steam railway that goes from Pant to Torpantau high in the Brecon Beacons.

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The Brecon Mountain Railway was conceived over 40 years ago when a search started to find a suitable site to build and  operate a steam railway using locomotives collected from around the world.

Merthyr Tydfil seemed ideally located at the southern edge of the Brecon Beacons National Park with its beautiful mountain, lake and forest scenery. At one time Merthyr Tydfil was the greatest iron making town in the world, most of the very early railways used rails rolled in Merthyr Mills. Merthyr witnessed, in 1804, the trial run of the worlds first steam railway locomotive built by Cornishman Richard Trevithick.

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The section of line chosen for the Brecon Mountain Railway was part of the abandoned Brecon and Merthyr Railway, originally built in 1859 it finally closed in 1964. This Railway fought its way through the Brecon Beacons using steep gradients to the summit at Torpantau 1313-ft above sea level.

Pant Station is at 1134 Feet (346m) above sea level and the first 600 yards (500m) of the route are built on a new alignment some of which was cut through solid rock. The original station site at Pant was not available when the trackbed was purchased.

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Upon leaving the platform at Pant Station the line curves right then left on a climbing gradient before joining the original trackbed of the Brecon and Merthyr Railway.

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We travelled in loco number 2 called Baldwin, which originally ran in South Africa.

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On the journey back we stopped at Pontsticill station, where as it was a hot day, most people purchased an ice cream from the little café there.

The return journey was 1 hour and 30 minutes with a 25 minute stop at Pontsticill.

visit us at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

 

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Trip to Cardiff (Caerdydd) Castle and town

Yesterday we went on the Buckland Bellringer’s coach trip to Cardiff. A 9.00am start saw us in Cardiff by 11.00am and we headed straight for the castle.

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Cardiff Castle is one of Wales’ leading heritage attractions and a site of international significance. Located within beautiful parklands at the heart of the capital, Cardiff Castle’s walls and fairytale towers conceal 2,000 years of history.

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After the Norman conquest, the Castle’s keep was built, re-using the site of the Roman fort. The first keep on the motte, erected by Robert Fitzhamon, Norman Lord of Gloucester, was probably built of wood. Further medieval fortifications and dwellings followed over the years.

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The Castle passed through the hands of many noble families until in 1766, it passed by marriage to the Bute family. The 2nd Marquess of Bute was responsible for turning Cardiff into the world’s greatest coal exporting port. The Castle and Bute fortune passed to his son John, the 3rd Marquess of Bute, who by the 1860s was reputed to be the richest man in the world.

Following the death of the 4th Marquess of Bute, the family decided to give the Castle and much of its parkland to the city of Cardiff. For 25 years, the Castle was home to the National College of Music and Drama and since 1974 has become one of Wales’ most popular visitor attractions.

We climbed up the steep steps to the Keep.

We walked the Battlement walk, and across the lawn where Neil paused by an 8lb gun.

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The Castle Apartments were really splendid.  First we visited the Arab room which had an amazing ceiling.

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Beautiful wall paintings and murals decorated the Banqueting Hall.

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The Library was well stocked with ancient books.

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Outside was an ornate and detailed clock tower.

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We stopped by where the Falcons were kept and used to scare off pigeons.

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In Cardiff town along the main shopping street where we stopped for some lunch were really colourful hanging baskets displays.

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Our next stop on our tour was the Brecon Mountain Railway but that is a subject for a separate blog.

visit us at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

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