Archive for Gardens

Taunton flower Show August 2019

We had never been to the Taunton Flower show before, even though it is very well established being the oldest flower show in the UK.  We prepaid our tickets but had to queue to get in.  Going at opening time obviously is the busiest time, won’t make that mistake again.DSC03375

The Taunton Flower Show takes place in Vivary Park which in itself has magnificent beds of flowers, run by the council.DSC03374

There were lots of craft stalls, and food stallsDSC03371

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and plant stalls, with metal objects for your garden being very popular this year.DSC03373

A Blacksmith was giving a demonstration.DSC03376

In the flower marquee there were air plants,DSC03383

and carnivorous plants,DSC03388

gladioli,DSC03385

and mixed displays of all sorts of other flowers.DSC03387

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We watched some GMX bikers in the arena doing somersaults in the air.DSC03382

The combined marching bands of Bideford & Barnstaple had both bagpipes and flutes and drums.  They were very good.DSC03380

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In the arena also was a dog agility show and then some aerial acrobatic girls who performed with long ribbons.DSC03391

Something for everyone.  It was very busy, lots of families and lots of people and it was hot today! The ducks were loving it.DSC03377

visit us http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

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Visit to The Eden Project in Cornwall

Last week we went down to Cornwall for a few days to celebrate our Silver Wedding Anniversary (25 years).  The main reason for choosing Cornwall was to visit the Eden Project, which was something I had wanted to do for ages.

Upon leaving the car parks and walking down through the entrance the first thing that hits you is the view of the Biomes.  They are big and really impressive.DSC03203

We headed straight for the Rainforest Biome. DSC03208

It was humid and full of mature trees and plants.  I particularly liked the red flowers of the Pineapple Ginger.DSC03211

We walked up to the higher paths of the canopy. DSC03215

We crossed the rope bridge but it was a bit wobbly!DSC03213

After leaving the Rainforest Biome we headed for the Mediterranean Biome.  I liked the terracotta pots of flowers.DSC03218

And some beautiful Lillies.DSC03219

I posed by some pink Bougainvillia.DSC03221

There were some deep russet flowers in the Australian section.DSC03222

Outside were some lovely flower beds and I spotted a bee in a scabia.DSC03225

A large wicker bee took us by surprise.DSC03206

But then we spotted  a metal butterfly.DSC03244

The deep purple poppies were really gorgeous.DSC03238

For an extra £30 you can have a go on the zip wire but that’s not for me!.DSC03245

We were also lucky with the weather in that it was a warm day and we managed to escape the rain.

The Eden project has many different areas to see and is well worth a visit.

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hestercombe

Sunday was a glorious sunny day and we visited Hestercombe House and Gardens, north of Taunton with Neil’s sister Carole and our friend Liz. The Hestercombe Gardens Trust was set up in 1997 to restore these world famous garden to their full glory.  The oldest part of the house dates back to 1280. It was owned by the family of Sir John de Warre for 500 years and went through quite a transformation in that time.  After Elizabeth Warre died the estate was bought by the 1st Viscount Portman and was later lived in by the Hon Teddy Portman, his grandson.  Teddy Portman died in 1911 but his wife continued to live in the house until her death in 1951 aged 96.

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In 1953 the newly formed Somerset Fire Brigade rented the house as its new headquarters and continued there until 2006.  In November 2013 the Hestercombe Gardens Trust acquired the freehold of the house and formal gardens and opened the house to the public in May 2014 for the first time in over 800 years.  The inside of the house has a contemporary art gallery and a 2nd hand bookshop.

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Outside the gardens are lovely with a number of lakes and a hydro electric plant. Over one of the lakes is a steep bridge which Neil posed on.

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With still water and beautiful sunshine the reflections in the lake were splendid.

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The Landscape Garden was built in the 18th century and throughout the garden are various seats, each with a view like a landscape painting.

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We stopped a fellow walker and asked them to take a picture of all 4 of us.

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This is the house from the garden.

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And I just loved this single water lily.

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The Portman family commissioned Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll to create the Edwardian Formal Garden in 1903 which took 5 years to complete.

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All in all it was a great visit, with a stop for tea and cake.  Easily reached from Lodge House B&B. If you fancy a visit, come and stay with us    www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

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Visit to Midelney Manor, Somerset

Today we visited Midelney Manor with the Combe St Nicholas History Group.  This is privately owned house, which is Grade 1 listed and was built in the late 16th Century in two distinct halves by brothers Richard & Thomas Trevillian.

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The manor house is sited on a former island site and was the property of Mulcheney Abbey before being passed to the Trevillian family after the dissolution of the monasteries.  We were shown around by Alice who lives there with her family and is a direct descendent of the Trevillian family.

Inside the lounge was a lovely fireplace and around the walls hung pictures of the ancestors.

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The gardens were lovely, mostly being walled with flower beds.

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We went through a doorway in the walls,

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to where the flower beds were full of blue cornflowers.

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The land extended to the back where there were some handsome massive trees and a paddock.

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At the end of the tour we were invited in for a cream tea which was much needed and well appreciated.  Midelney Manor is just half an hour’s drive from us at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk.

 

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Abundant Almonds

Our Almond tree groaned with the weight of the nuts it had produced and then one heavy limb broke off.  We propped it up the best we could and hoped the nuts would still ripen.

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The branch that had snapped seem to have more nuts than any other.

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The outer casing was starting to crack open on a lot of the nuts, revealing the shell of the actual nut inside.

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This afternoon I have picked two big pots full and will dry them out and then crack off the outer casing.  We will have our own nuts for Xmas!!

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

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Lovely Foxgloves

In our back border have sprung up some lovely purple Foxgloves.

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And some more:

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And in close up:

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They look fabulous towering over the fence.  I shall sprinkle the seeds later on and hopefully we will get some more next year.  I just love them!!

see them for  yourself, visit http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Visit to historic house at Sand, East Devon.

On Monday we went on a trip to an historic house at Sand, East Devon organised by the Combe History Society of which Neil is a member.  It is most unusual for us to take time out, let along on a Monday!!

From its website it gives the following information. “An historic house lived in by the family who have owned it and shared their history with it for over 500 years; a tranquil garden in an idyllic setting – In its peaceful East Devon valley, this historic stone house is set in about 6 acres of varied gardens. Gardens in which to relax, to wander round corners, to gaze at the views, to sit and watch the birds. A sun baked terrace, shady woodland, lawns and borders – something for everyone.
The family house is principally Elizabethan. the resident members of the family Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires, provide guided tours showing a wealth of period interior features as well as an adjacent mediaeval hall house. They tell of the history, of the delights and difficulties and the unexpected aspects of living in and maintaining an historic house.”

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We had a guided tour of the house and were told of the history which went back to Edward de Sand in the 1200’s.

This fireplace is in the main chamber and dates from 1500 when the design was very fashionable. It is rumoured that Catherine of Aragon stayed there on her way from Plymouth to London to marry the brother of Henry VIII, who died after 6 months, and she later married Henry VIII. There is a stained glass panel of her coat of arms in the grand hall.

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We also wandered around the gardens which were really lovely.

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They had these really big poppies in both red

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and pink.

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One of our group was in a wheel chair and the terrain around the gardens wasn’t exactly suitable, so Neil got involved in helping to push.

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All in all it was a really interesting afternoon out.  If you want to visit Sand yourself, why not stay at our B&B which is less than half an hour’s drive away?

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

 

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