Archive for Historic House

Hestercombe

Sunday was a glorious sunny day and we visited Hestercombe House and Gardens, north of Taunton with Neil’s sister Carole and our friend Liz. The Hestercombe Gardens Trust was set up in 1997 to restore these world famous garden to their full glory.  The oldest part of the house dates back to 1280. It was owned by the family of Sir John de Warre for 500 years and went through quite a transformation in that time.  After Elizabeth Warre died the estate was bought by the 1st Viscount Portman and was later lived in by the Hon Teddy Portman, his grandson.  Teddy Portman died in 1911 but his wife continued to live in the house until her death in 1951 aged 96.

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In 1953 the newly formed Somerset Fire Brigade rented the house as its new headquarters and continued there until 2006.  In November 2013 the Hestercombe Gardens Trust acquired the freehold of the house and formal gardens and opened the house to the public in May 2014 for the first time in over 800 years.  The inside of the house has a contemporary art gallery and a 2nd hand bookshop.

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Outside the gardens are lovely with a number of lakes and a hydro electric plant. Over one of the lakes is a steep bridge which Neil posed on.

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With still water and beautiful sunshine the reflections in the lake were splendid.

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The Landscape Garden was built in the 18th century and throughout the garden are various seats, each with a view like a landscape painting.

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We stopped a fellow walker and asked them to take a picture of all 4 of us.

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This is the house from the garden.

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And I just loved this single water lily.

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The Portman family commissioned Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll to create the Edwardian Formal Garden in 1903 which took 5 years to complete.

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All in all it was a great visit, with a stop for tea and cake.  Easily reached from Lodge House B&B. If you fancy a visit, come and stay with us    www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

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Visit to Midelney Manor, Somerset

Today we visited Midelney Manor with the Combe St Nicholas History Group.  This is privately owned house, which is Grade 1 listed and was built in the late 16th Century in two distinct halves by brothers Richard & Thomas Trevillian.

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The manor house is sited on a former island site and was the property of Mulcheney Abbey before being passed to the Trevillian family after the dissolution of the monasteries.  We were shown around by Alice who lives there with her family and is a direct descendent of the Trevillian family.

Inside the lounge was a lovely fireplace and around the walls hung pictures of the ancestors.

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The gardens were lovely, mostly being walled with flower beds.

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We went through a doorway in the walls,

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to where the flower beds were full of blue cornflowers.

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The land extended to the back where there were some handsome massive trees and a paddock.

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At the end of the tour we were invited in for a cream tea which was much needed and well appreciated.  Midelney Manor is just half an hour’s drive from us at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk.

 

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Visit to Wells

Last week we went on a coach trip to Wells.  I help out at an old people’s club and it was their annual outing.  As Neil and I had neither of us been to Wells we both went along.  We were really lucky with the weather, had a glorious sunny day.

The first stop was the cathedral.  Built in the 12th century it is most imposing.

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This is the West Front and contains one of the largest galleries of medieval sculpture in the world.  Starting in the lower niches with biblical scenes it rises through kings, bishops and orders of angels to the 12 apostles with Christ over all.

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In the nave the eye is drawn to the unique “Scissor arches” which were a medieval solution (1338-48) to sinking tower foundations.

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The ceilings were also really beautiful.

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The cathedral contains a massive organ.

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The western end of the cathedral contains the Quire which forms the oldest part of the present cathedral.

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Wells Cathedral has one of the most substantial collections of medieval stained glass in England, the crowning glory being known as the Jesse window.

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I particularly liked this frieze in one of the chapels.

We left the cathedral and moved onto the Bishop’s Palace, home to the Bishops of Bath & wells for over 800 years. It is a stunning medieval Palace situated in 14 acres of landscaped gardens and home to the wells and spring pools that give the City of Wells its name. Outside is a moat with medieval drawbridge and home to the resident mute swans of Wells.

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Outside croquet was being played, the participants all in traditional white.

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Inside was a marvellous stair case with wyverns and the most illustrious wall paper.

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The Long Gallery contained portraits of Bishops throughout the ages.

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There were some contemporary touches with this modern angel sculpture in one room.

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And in the gardens these angel wings which I couldn’t help but stand in front of.

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The gardens were beautifully laid out.

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All in all a well worth trip and only an hour from us at Lodge House.

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Visit to historic house at Sand, East Devon.

On Monday we went on a trip to an historic house at Sand, East Devon organised by the Combe History Society of which Neil is a member.  It is most unusual for us to take time out, let along on a Monday!!

From its website it gives the following information. “An historic house lived in by the family who have owned it and shared their history with it for over 500 years; a tranquil garden in an idyllic setting – In its peaceful East Devon valley, this historic stone house is set in about 6 acres of varied gardens. Gardens in which to relax, to wander round corners, to gaze at the views, to sit and watch the birds. A sun baked terrace, shady woodland, lawns and borders – something for everyone.
The family house is principally Elizabethan. the resident members of the family Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires, provide guided tours showing a wealth of period interior features as well as an adjacent mediaeval hall house. They tell of the history, of the delights and difficulties and the unexpected aspects of living in and maintaining an historic house.”

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We had a guided tour of the house and were told of the history which went back to Edward de Sand in the 1200’s.

This fireplace is in the main chamber and dates from 1500 when the design was very fashionable. It is rumoured that Catherine of Aragon stayed there on her way from Plymouth to London to marry the brother of Henry VIII, who died after 6 months, and she later married Henry VIII. There is a stained glass panel of her coat of arms in the grand hall.

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We also wandered around the gardens which were really lovely.

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They had these really big poppies in both red

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and pink.

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One of our group was in a wheel chair and the terrain around the gardens wasn’t exactly suitable, so Neil got involved in helping to push.

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All in all it was a really interesting afternoon out.  If you want to visit Sand yourself, why not stay at our B&B which is less than half an hour’s drive away?

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

 

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