Posts Tagged countryside

A different walk across the A303.

This morning we set off in a different direction for our walk.  As the A303 is so quiet at the moment we decided to cross it and walk down towards Beetham.20200414_113906

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On the way we passed a lovely big rainbow painted on the front of someone’s drive, thanking the NHS – really great.20200414_112947

We walked down to the caravan park which has a notice on it saying it is closed now until the 30th June due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The country lanes were deserted apart from a tractor.20200414_113252

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We noticed all the flowers in the hedges, the bluebells are starting to come out.20200414_113443

Some pretty little white flowers that we are not sure what they are.20200414_113624

And some cow parsley is in flower.20200414_114013We crossed back over the A303 and again it was deserted, so unusual.20200414_113854

We headed back towards home.20200414_113929

As we walked along the lanes we admired the view.20200414_114050

Quite a spectacular tree en route.20200414_114309

And then some blossom in someone’s garden.20200414_114535

Approaching our house we commented on the white bluebells on the corner.20200414_115020

We have narcissus growing in front of our wall.20200414_115201

And Forget-me-nots all the way down the wall on the RH side.20200414_115228

I love all the primroses at the this time of year.20200414_115239

We also have bluebells coming out.20200414_115246

And these are the pots of tulips on our front garden patio.20200414_115301

Not guests at the moment due to the lockdown, but time for lovely walks in the country and quite a bit of gardening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last walk up Staple Hill before Lockdown

On Monday the sun was shining and we were able to take the car to Staple Hill to walk round the circular path there.  There was hardly a soul about, we only passed one other couple the whole way round.DSC03833

We noticed the fir trees had new growth which was blueish in colour.DSC03834

We could see where some trees had been felled to give more light in the woods.DSC03836

We wandered off the path to the edge of a ravine which dropped away sharply.DSC03838

The view was a bit hazy but still lovely.DSC03842

Since the new regulations on Tuesday we are not allowed to drive anywhere to go for a walk, so we won’t be going to Staple Hill again in the near future, just staying at home, in the garden, or around the country lanes where we live.  Still we are very fortunate to have a garden and to live in the country.  It’s much harder for folks living in a tower block in London.

Stay safe everyone and let’s hope this pandemic passes quickly.

 

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My two favourite walks

Yesterday a friend, whom we’d not seem for a few years, came to visit us.  It was lovely to see her again, and we were lucky in that the sun shone, even though the wind was cold.  After lunch we took her up to Staple Hill, which is one of my 2 favourite places nearby to go for a walk.

A wonderful tree at Staple Hill

Staple Hill is one of the highest places in the Blackdown Hills, Somerset, England and on a fine day it is said you can see right over to Wales. 

 From there we got back in the car and headed the short distance to Otterhead Lakes at Otterford.  At this time of year the bluebells are out in force and there are carpets of blue in the woods.

 English native bluebells have flowers on one side only and droop to the side.  Unfortunately there has been an influx of spanish bluebells in garden centres and these have flowers all the way round.  Luckily in established woodland the bluebells are all native English ones.

 We also spotted some wild garlic with pretty little white flowers and lots of ferns growing up poised ready to unfurl as these ones below.

It’s a lovely walk down to the first lake, then along  a footpath by the side of a stream, across a footbridge and then eventually the path comes out by the second lake.  We met a couple of guys walking their dogs and they took a photo of all 3 of us on the footbridge.

 

The footbridge at Otterhead Lakes

You can see we are well wrapped up as it was quite chilly yesterday, but it is a lovely spot for a walk, really beautiful with all those bluebells.

 If you want to visit Staple Hill or Otterhead Lakes and stay at our B&B, visit us at www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Invasion in the paddock

We’ve had an invasion in the paddock.  An invasion of Himalyan Balsam plant, which grows tall, over 6 feet tall, and has a pretty pink flower.  The bees love it as they are drawn to the sweet nectar. So we let them have their fill of it.

The pink flowers of Himalyan Balsam

However, it is a weed, not just a weed but a viscous thug of a weed. It spreads and will take over a patch of land. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pods burst and spread the seeds up to 7 metres or 21 feet, so the following year encroaching on more land.

Himalyan Balsam is said to be as much of a nuisance as Japanese Knotweed and needs to be destroyed.  So one afternoon this week, Neil and I went down to the bottom of the paddock and pulled up all the Himalyan Balsam (it is quite shallow rooted) and put on a bonfire.  The next day Neil set light to it all.

Neil with his bonfire August 2011

The bonfire smouldered and smoked for over a day, but eventually that was the end of the Himalyan Balsam for another summer.

see our website www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Bullies in the hen run!

As our existing hens are getting on in hen years, 6 being 2 years old and 6 being 2 and a half years old,  and not laying so many eggs these days, we decided it was time to get some new hens called “point of lay pullets”.  This means the new hens are only 18 weeks old and at the time in their life when they start to lay eggs.

So 4 new Brown Warrens duly arrived on Friday evening.  We put pink leg rings on them so we could tell them apart from the others, but in fact they are much darker brown so quite easy to differentiate anyway.

The new gels - the pink legs!

But our existing hens were none too happy about the new arrivals.  As soon as the new gels ventured out into the hen run,  the older ones would jump at them and peck them, until they ran back into the hen house.  This is the third day now we have had the new gels, and still they are cowering in the hen house run.

The new gels taking cover in the hen house run.

We’ve been told that if you put them all in together at night, then they get used to each other and the bullying should stop.  But at night the new gels don’t want to go into the hen house, and each night, Neil has had to don his leather gloves and pick them up one by one and pop them in the hen house with the others.

Hopefully over time, once the pecking order is well and truly established, the bullying should stop and the new gels will be free to roam the hen run without fear.

We should start to get some lovely brown eggs now for our B&B guests from the new hens.

visit us at www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Sunflowers

Ah Sunflower, weary of time,
Who countest the steps of the sun;
Seeking after that sweet golden clime
Where the traveller’s journey is done;”

so starts the poem by William Blake about sunflowers. 

Last year we grew some sunflowers from seed.  They were quite successful and produced big heads.  When they died down I took the seeds and fed them to the chickens.  Unbeknown to us, the chooks didn’t eat them all but left some on the ground.  When we moved the chicken run, these seeds were left to germinate all on their own, and this year they have produced lovely flowers amongst all the other wildflowers (weeds!) that have grown up in the paddock where the chickens used to be.

sunflowers in the paddock August 2011

What is ironic is that the sunflowers I have grown from seed this year are a pathetic 2 feet tall and nowhere near flowering.

sunflower in the paddock August 2011

So you know what I am going to do later on this year when these flowers have died back – I am going to sprinkle the seeds all round the wild part of the paddock, and with any luck next year I will have a field of sunflowers!!

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Lovely drains!!!

One of the “delights” of living in the country is not being on mains sewerage, but having a drain at the back of the kitchen through which all our shower water, dishwasher water, washine machine water and sewerage goes, which then has another pipe leading to the septic tank.

Those of you who receive our newsletter will know the fun and games we had last year with the septic tank, which, touch wood, seems to be working OK now.

However, yesterday Neil noticed at the back of the kitchen that water had built up in the drain.  He took the lid off and found the whole drain blocked up.  Lovely!!

So he got his pressure washer out and squirted water up the pipe from the septic tank end.

Neil with the pressure washer in the septic tank

He managed to dislodge some “gunk” and suddenly the drain emptied down the pipe into the septic tank.  So then he got a piece of sturdy pipe and put that down the pipe from the drain end, all the way along the pipe into the septic tank end.

Neil with pipe in the drain

To make sure all was free running again, he then pressure washed from the drain to the septic tank to ensure all debris was dislodged.  This worked fine, so now we have working drains again.  What a lovely job!!  I hope we don’t have this problem again when we have guests for B&B.  It would be aweful to have to say to them not to flush the loo until we have sorted the drains out!!  Yuk!!

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