Posts Tagged Gardens

Visit to Midelney Manor, Somerset

Today we visited Midelney Manor with the Combe St Nicholas History Group.  This is privately owned house, which is Grade 1 listed and was built in the late 16th Century in two distinct halves by brothers Richard & Thomas Trevillian.

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The manor house is sited on a former island site and was the property of Mulcheney Abbey before being passed to the Trevillian family after the dissolution of the monasteries.  We were shown around by Alice who lives there with her family and is a direct descendent of the Trevillian family.

Inside the lounge was a lovely fireplace and around the walls hung pictures of the ancestors.

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The gardens were lovely, mostly being walled with flower beds.

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We went through a doorway in the walls,

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to where the flower beds were full of blue cornflowers.

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The land extended to the back where there were some handsome massive trees and a paddock.

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At the end of the tour we were invited in for a cream tea which was much needed and well appreciated.  Midelney Manor is just half an hour’s drive from us at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk.

 

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Visit to Wells

Last week we went on a coach trip to Wells.  I help out at an old people’s club and it was their annual outing.  As Neil and I had neither of us been to Wells we both went along.  We were really lucky with the weather, had a glorious sunny day.

The first stop was the cathedral.  Built in the 12th century it is most imposing.

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This is the West Front and contains one of the largest galleries of medieval sculpture in the world.  Starting in the lower niches with biblical scenes it rises through kings, bishops and orders of angels to the 12 apostles with Christ over all.

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In the nave the eye is drawn to the unique “Scissor arches” which were a medieval solution (1338-48) to sinking tower foundations.

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The ceilings were also really beautiful.

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The cathedral contains a massive organ.

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The western end of the cathedral contains the Quire which forms the oldest part of the present cathedral.

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Wells Cathedral has one of the most substantial collections of medieval stained glass in England, the crowning glory being known as the Jesse window.

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I particularly liked this frieze in one of the chapels.

We left the cathedral and moved onto the Bishop’s Palace, home to the Bishops of Bath & wells for over 800 years. It is a stunning medieval Palace situated in 14 acres of landscaped gardens and home to the wells and spring pools that give the City of Wells its name. Outside is a moat with medieval drawbridge and home to the resident mute swans of Wells.

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Outside croquet was being played, the participants all in traditional white.

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Inside was a marvellous stair case with wyverns and the most illustrious wall paper.

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The Long Gallery contained portraits of Bishops throughout the ages.

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There were some contemporary touches with this modern angel sculpture in one room.

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And in the gardens these angel wings which I couldn’t help but stand in front of.

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The gardens were beautifully laid out.

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All in all a well worth trip and only an hour from us at Lodge House.

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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Visit to historic house at Sand, East Devon.

On Monday we went on a trip to an historic house at Sand, East Devon organised by the Combe History Society of which Neil is a member.  It is most unusual for us to take time out, let along on a Monday!!

From its website it gives the following information. “An historic house lived in by the family who have owned it and shared their history with it for over 500 years; a tranquil garden in an idyllic setting – In its peaceful East Devon valley, this historic stone house is set in about 6 acres of varied gardens. Gardens in which to relax, to wander round corners, to gaze at the views, to sit and watch the birds. A sun baked terrace, shady woodland, lawns and borders – something for everyone.
The family house is principally Elizabethan. the resident members of the family Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires, provide guided tours showing a wealth of period interior features as well as an adjacent mediaeval hall house. They tell of the history, of the delights and difficulties and the unexpected aspects of living in and maintaining an historic house.”

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We had a guided tour of the house and were told of the history which went back to Edward de Sand in the 1200’s.

This fireplace is in the main chamber and dates from 1500 when the design was very fashionable. It is rumoured that Catherine of Aragon stayed there on her way from Plymouth to London to marry the brother of Henry VIII, who died after 6 months, and she later married Henry VIII. There is a stained glass panel of her coat of arms in the grand hall.

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We also wandered around the gardens which were really lovely.

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They had these really big poppies in both red

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and pink.

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One of our group was in a wheel chair and the terrain around the gardens wasn’t exactly suitable, so Neil got involved in helping to push.

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All in all it was a really interesting afternoon out.  If you want to visit Sand yourself, why not stay at our B&B which is less than half an hour’s drive away?

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

 

 

 

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A lovely walk at Cricket St Thomas Lakes and Gardens

Yesterday, being a lovely day and us having Neil’s sister visiting, we took ourselves off to the Lakes and Gardens at Cricket St Thomas for a wander around.  We had never been before so it was a new one on all of us.  We started off by going past a little church that was originally for the estate.

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Then as we turned the corner we saw a magnificent tree in the foreground of the house, which is now a Warner Leisure hotel.

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You will note the figure doing a head stand in the foreground, that is actually a brass figure.  There were quite a few brass figures around the gardens, mostly of children playing.

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As we walked down the hill there were great views of the lakes.

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We saw in the distance a red bridge and walked nearer to see if we could cross it.

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We found that it was a railway bridge and there used to be a little train that ran round the grounds and took visitors to Noel Edmund’s “Mr Blobby Land”, that isn’t there any more.  We couldn’t cross the bridge as it was closed to pedestrians.

There were waterfalls:

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And a grotto with a waterfall in front:-

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Everywhere you looked there were lovely views:-

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We stumbled across a really tall monkey puzzle tree that must have been quite old, looking at it’s size.

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At the bottom of a path I found a circular piece of modern art, through which I took a photo of a little bridge.

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On the road out of the estate we passed fields of sheep and cows.  Here the cows (or more precisely bullocks) were right by the road, so I am glad they were not blocking our route.

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Along the road out we saw this sign about pheasants:

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As we exited the estate and were about to turn out onto the road we had this gorgeous view of the countryside.

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All in all it was a lovely afternoon walk and we didn’t even have to pay an entry fee.

If you want to visit Cricket St Thomas Lakes and Gardens for yourself, why not stay at our B&B?  look us up at

http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

or our phone and tablet friendly website is http://www.lodgehousebandb.tel

Please like us on facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/LodgeHouseBandB

 

 

 

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Visit to Burrow Farm Gardens and Charmouth Beach

Today, being our 20th wedding anniversary and also a lovely sunny day, we took ourselves out for the day.  The first place we visited was Burrow Farm Gardens.  It is 10 acres of beautiful gardens, ponds, bogs, woodland garden and beautiful views.  This was the Millenium Garden.

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There were some lovely really large Iris flowers in this garden.

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I spotted a really large wild foxglove.

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There were several stone statues throughout the gardens.

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There were quite a few specimens of this plant that looks like enormous rhubarb and has the most gigantic leaves, I don’t know what it is called.

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We sat by the pond watching the ducks and admiring the view up the hill.

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We had a spot of lunch in their tea rooms and then left for the coast.  Charmouth is just a bit further East of Lyme Regis and is quite unspoilt and not commercialised at all.  It is a stony beach and when we walked along the pebbles the wind came up although it was really sunny. This is me in front of the beach huts.

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And this is Neil along the beach.

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There was one lady in the sea having a dip but we contented ourselves with Neil skimming stones and me watching!!

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And then of course we stopped to have an ice cream – got to be done when you are on the beach.  So all in all a really pleasant day out and all not far from here.

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Visit to Montecute House

Today being a gorgeous sunny day Neil and I decided to have a day out and visit a National Trust property called Montecute House here in Somerset.  It is an Elizabethan house built of the local ham stone.  This is what the National Trust says about the house:-

Montacute House is a magnificent, glittering mansion, built in the late 16th century for Sir Edward Phelips. There are many renaissance features, and the Long Gallery, the longest of its kind in England, displays over 60 of the finest Tudor and Elizabethan portraits from the National Portrait Gallery collection. The state rooms display a fine range of period furniture and textiles, including samplers from the Goodhart collection.

Montacute’s formal gardens are perfect for a stroll and include a collection of roses, mixed borders and famous wobbly hedges. Waymarked walks lead around the wider estate, which encompasses St Michael’s Hill.

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Firstly we wondered around the house, looking at the paintings and tapestries, bedrooms, library and other rooms.  Here is a selection of photos from our visit:-

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The gardens were lovely, there is a walled garden with beautiful flower borders that lead to the pudding houses.  In Elizabethan times after the main meal, the dessert would be taken in a separate building called a pudding house.

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Another formal garden housed a lovely pond and water fountain.  If you stood to one side you could be gentled drizzled by it’s water, great for a hot day!!

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There were the most beautiful delphiniums:

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And alliums:

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Here is a view I took looking out from the house to the gardens:-

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And here is a view through the windows:

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We had our lunch there and a bit later on a little icecream and sat in the shade under a tree to eat it, lovely!!  Here is a side view of the house taken from the garden with the water fountain in.

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Montecute House is well worth a visit if you are ever down this way in Somerset.  Stay with us and you can easily visit from our house.

We still have some vacancies in July and August in the bed and breakfast.

look us up at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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visit to Killerton House

On Tuesday we decided to visit an National Trust property as we are members and want to make use of our membership.  Killerton House is about 30 miles from here in Devon.

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According to the National Trust Sir Richard Acland gave away his family home for his political beliefs. His estate, at 2,590 hectares (6,400 acres) it is one of the largest the Trust has acquired (it includes 20 farms and 200-plus cottages).

Killerton House, built in 1778-9, brings to life generations of the Aclands, one of Devon’s oldest families. This year there is a fashion exhibition ‘Objects of Desire’ designed and guest-curated by renowned interior designer Russell Sage.

The masterpiece of Killerton, beautiful all year round, is the garden created by John Veitch – with rhododendrons, magnolias and rare trees surrounded by rolling Devon countryside.

The first room we visited was the music room that had its own organ.

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There was beautiful furniture, paintings, and collections of porcelain.

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There was also a well stocked library. We went up the lovely staircase to

an exhibition of fashion.

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There were exhibits of vintage clothing and shoes:

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The gardens outside were really lovely, lots of unusual trees and flowering shrubs and a flower border.

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There was a “bear hut” where the son of the family kept his pet bear.  The ceiling was decorated with pine cones.

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Then we visited the little chapel with its lovely stained glass windows.

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As we walked back to the car park we were met by a flock of sheep.  One made us laugh as he was down on his knees eating grass.

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We came across this fabulous twisted tree:

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The sun shone for us and we had a cream tea before heading home.

Look us up at http://www.lodgehousebandbsomerset.co.uk

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